What is diabetes?

There are three different kinds of diabetes—type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes.  In all three types, there is a problem with the body that results in there being more glucose (or sugar) in the blood than there should be.

High levels of sugar in your blood over a long period of time can cause heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and amputations. But all of these complications can be avoided by keeping your blood sugar in a safe range.

The good news is that we can help you learn what you need to know and do to get your blood sugar where it needs to be. Click here to learn more.

Why is it important to take care of your diabetes?

When your blood sugar is close to normal, you are going to FEEL better. You will:

  • Have more energy
  • Be less tired and thirsty
  • Not need to go to the bathroom as much
  • Have fewer infections
  • Be the best YOU that you can be
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OK, that’s the basics. Would you like to learn a little bit more? If so, keep reading…

Type 2 diabetes is the most common kind of diabetes, accounting for 90% to 95% of people who have diabetes.  If you have type 2, either your body doesn’t produce enough insulin (a hormone that helps your body process sugar), ignores the insulin it does make, and sometimes both.  Type 2 diabetes can develop at any age, although it is more likely to occur as you get older.

Who gets Type 2 Diabetes?

Anyone can get Type 2 diabetes, but you may be at higher risk if you are overweight, smoke, have had gestational diabetes, have family members with Type 2 diabetes, have pre-diabetes or are over 45.  Click here to take a risk test.

What are the signs and symptoms of diabetes?

Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how high your blood sugar is. Some people may not experience symptoms initially, so it’s better to go ahead and talk to your doctor about getting tested for diabetes if you’re experiencing any of them. Some of the symptoms and early warning signs of diabetes include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Fatigue
  • Blurred vision
  • Slow-healing sores
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal or bladder infections
  • Extreme hunger
  • Unexplained weight loss

If you suspect you or someone you love may have diabetes or if you notice any possible diabetes symptoms, contact your doctor. The earlier you are diagnosed, the sooner treatment can begin, and the healthier you will be.

Lastly, if you’d like to read more from people who have type 2, here are some blogs we would recommend:

Type 1 diabetes

People with Type 1 diabetes account for about 5% of all cases of diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin– people with Type 1 need to take insulin every day to live.  Type 1 typically develops in children and young adults, although there are cases of it happening later in life as well.

The resources on this site are predominantly geared towards folks with Type 2.  If you have Type 1 and would like to learn more, here’s a list of sites that will be helpful:

For adults with type 1:

For parents of kids with type 1:

What is gestational diabetes?

During pregnancy, some women—usually around their 24th week— develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is caused by the hormones of pregnancy or a shortage of insulin, and sometimes both. Having gestational diabetes doesn’t mean that you will have diabetes after you give birth, although it does increase your risk. It’s very important to follow your doctor’s advice while you’re pregnant so you and your baby remain healthy. All women should be checked for gestational diabetes in their 24th to 28th week of pregnancy—if you’re pregnant, talk to your doctor to make sure you’ve been screened.

Here are a few places where you can learn more about gestational diabetes:

What is pre-diabetes?

If you have pre-diabetes, your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Many people with pre-diabetes go on to develop diabetes, and if you have pre-diabetes, you are at 50% higher risk of heart disease and stroke than someone who does not have pre-diabetes.

There is good news, however—making lifestyle changes (like exercising daily, losing weight and eating balanced meals) can help many people with pre-diabetes delay or even prevent developing diabetes. For information about the changes you can make to reduce your risk for diabetes, heart attack and stroke, click here.

What are the signs and symptoms of diabetes?

Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how high your blood sugar is. Some people may not experience symptoms initially, so it’s better to go ahead and talk to your doctor about getting tested for diabetes if you’re experiencing any of them. Some of the symptoms and early warning signs of diabetes include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Fatigue
  • Blurred vision
  • Slow-healing sores
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal or bladder infections
  • Extreme hunger
  • Unexplained weight loss

If you suspect you or someone you love may have diabetes or if you notice any possible diabetes symptoms, contact your doctor. The earlier you are diagnosed, the sooner treatment can begin, and the healthier you will be.

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